Keeneland

'Colonel Sanders' takes top prize at Lexington fun run, where costumes trump speed

Racers lined up Sunday for the Kentucky for Kentucky 25-Furlong race at the Kentucky Horse Park. The event was part of the Breeders' Cup Festival and featured many costume-clad competitors.
Racers lined up Sunday for the Kentucky for Kentucky 25-Furlong race at the Kentucky Horse Park. The event was part of the Breeders' Cup Festival and featured many costume-clad competitors.

Henry Clay and Daniel Boone ran the race with a Kentucky flag between them. Two Kentucky Fried Chicks rode in their double stroller. And Colonel Sanders took a leisurely stroll with his walking stick, for a very good reason.

"I'm afraid if I get out there and start moving, everything stuck to my face might fall off," confessed Evelyn Jane Barker, aka the Colonel.

It was a good call as Barker won the $1,000 offered by the Kentucky for Kentucky Fun Run 25-Furlong (5K) for the best costume, in part due to the meticulous mustache and goatee glued to her face.

About 300 entrants took part in the race at the Kentucky Horse Park, one of the events for the Breeders' Cup Festival this week. Organizer Kip Cornett said Saturday's Feeders' Cup, featuring 21 food trucks, attracted a huge crowd, a good omen for the week. Another event, the Lyric Theater's presentation of I Dedicate this Ride: The Making of Isaac Burns Murphy, drew more than 500 people Saturday night.

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Kentucky for Kentucky's Griffin Van Meter said they hoped to continue the footrace next year, even without a big event like the Breeders' Cup.

"We want to try to build up costume culture," he said.

As co-founders of Kentucky for Kentucky, he and Whit Hiler got to judge the costumes. The runners-up were Tim Bailey as Boone and Shaun Tolle as Clay, and Peter Cook as a Kentucky hot Brown with a large piece of sandwich bread attached to his back.

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But Barker's Colonel Sanders won the day, and when she won, Van Meter said, she made a very Kentucky remark:

"She was really glad because her horse had just gotten pregnant, so she needed the money to take care of her," he said.

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