Baseball

MLB notes: Red Sox PA announcer killed in car crash

This is a 2011 photo of pitcher Mariano Rivera of the New York Yankees baseball team.  This image reflects the Yankees active roster as of Wednesday, Feb. 23, 2011, when this image was taken. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
This is a 2011 photo of pitcher Mariano Rivera of the New York Yankees baseball team. This image reflects the Yankees active roster as of Wednesday, Feb. 23, 2011, when this image was taken. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall) ASSOCIATED PRESS

Boston Red Sox public address announcer Carl Beane, the voice of Fenway Park whose booming baritone called ballplayers to the plate for two World Series champions, died on Wednesday after suffering a heart attack while driving. He was 59.

"We are filled with sadness at this tragic news," Red Sox president Larry Lucchino said in a statement issued by the team. "His legion of friends with the Red Sox and the media will miss him enormously, and all of Red Sox Nation will remember his presence, his warmth, and his voice."

The Worcester District Attorney said that Beane died in an accident after his car, an SUV with a spare tire cover stitched to look like a baseball, crossed the double yellow lines and left the road before hitting a tree and a wall. He was pronounced dead at Harrington Hospital in Southbridge a short time later, according to a release from D.A. Joseph D. Early Jr.

Cordero out as Blue Jays' closer

Francisco Cordero understands why he is no longer Toronto's closer. That doesn't mean he likes being demoted one bit. The Blue Jays moved the struggling Cordero to middle relief on Wednesday, a day after he surrendered a game-ending grand slam to Brandon Inge in a 7-3 loss to the Athletics. "I think it's the right decision because I ain't doing my job," said Cordero, a 14-year veteran who turns 37 on Friday. Cordero (1-2) has 329 saves but has blown his last three opportunities. Casey Janssen will handle the ninth-inning duties for now.

Rivera has blood clot in calf

Mariano Rivera has a blood clot in his right calf, the latest health problem for the longtime New York Yankees closer who tore a knee ligament last week while shagging fly balls during batting practice. Rivera is on blood-thinning medication intended to dissolve the clot and says he is OK, though he was scared when he received the diagnosis. He needs to spend at least a week or two strengthening his knee before he has surgery.

Short hops

■ New White Sox closer Chris Sale will undergo an MRI on his sore left elbow. Chicago pitching coach Don Cooper said Sale will have the test Thursday. Manager Robin Ventura recently named Sale his closer after the left-hander made five starts but had tenderness in his elbow. He went 3-1 with a 2.81 ERA.

■ Royals pitcher Jonathan Sanchez, who was 1-2 with a 6.75 ERA in six starts, was placed on the 15-day disabled list Wednesday with left biceps tendinitis.

■ A small group of baseball fans is suing Major League Baseball, its clubs and some television broadcast entities, claiming they collude to eliminate competition in the showing of games on the Internet and television. The antitrust lawsuit filed Wednesday seeks a court declaration that the defendants engage in antitrust behavior and appropriate remedies, including unspecified damages. The plaintiffs said they are blocked from obtaining Internet-delivered videos of local games without paying a costly subscription fee.

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