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Generations come back to the Dirt Bowl

The Heat took on the Spurs in the men's division of Super Sunday games during Dirt Bowl play at Douglass Park.
The Heat took on the Spurs in the men's division of Super Sunday games during Dirt Bowl play at Douglass Park.

Generations of basketball players of all ages have competed in Lexington's Dirt Bowl league. Families eagerly await the annual Super Sunday festival at Douglass Park, an event that celebrates the tournament and includes food and entertainment.

Gina Scearce held a pink umbrella overhead for shade from the heat Sunday as she watched from the bleachers as her son Michael Scearce Jr. played during the Junior Dirt Bowl tournament. Her younger son, James Scearce, had played earlier during the Sun Bowl, the event for players younger than 13.

Scearce's husband, Michael Scearce, played in the Dirt Bowl while he was in high school. He was a standout at Henry Clay before going to Purdue, where he was a sophomore when the team made it to the Final Four in 1980.

Jill Chenault Wilson, who works for Lexington Parks and Recreation and helps coordinate the event, said she used to attend Super Sunday with her father. Michael Scearce always drew a crowd when he played, she said.

Recent University of Kentucky basketball recruits and former players often are spotted at the event, which has been held for more than 30 years.

Stacey Poole Jr., who was the first player in the high school Class of 2010 to sign with Kentucky, said he wanted to watch his barber's son in the tournament. Poole occasionally stopped to take pictures with fans as he stood near the court.

Super Sunday is hosted by the Georgetown Street Neighborhood Association, which organizes the vendors at the park.

"It's a family thing," association president Michael Haskins said. "It's been like that for years."

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