Paul Prather

Paul Prather

Rampant crime and a tanking economy? Really? Look again

Fairly regularly, one or another of my Facebook friends announces that he has secured a permit to carry a concealed weapon. I have no problem with that. I was raised around guns. What puzzles me is the notice of besiegement that accompanies these announcements. Let’s not let our feelings hijack our reason.

Paul Prather

If you need something to worry about, consider the state of newspapers

If I were to pick one current economic or social trend I consider the most dangerous, it would be the decline of the newspaper industry. As you probably know, formerly vibrant newspapers across the country have cut their staffs to the nub. Yet they continue hemorrhaging money. Some big-city dailies have closed altogether. Those that remain are wobbly.

Paul Prather

If we give a little and act like adults,we can overcome big rifts

Humility ought to be a starting point for our social discourse. Sad to say, it has been largely discarded as a public — or, for that matter, a private — virtue. I think about this a lot, especially when I’m listening to preachers or political candidates or various activists rage on TV. I thought of it again recently while reading the “Ethicist” column in the online New York Times Magazine.

Paul Prather

Promise to make a difference in somebody’s life

I was thinking about my mother on Mother’s Day. She wasn’t rich or famous or highly educated or socially prominent or even particularly sociable. Yet she deeply touched others’ lives. She managed this without making a single grand gesture. She did it just by loving people, and by being kind to them, and by going out of her way for them.

Paul Prather

Haggard’s songs offer insight to Trump, anger

When Merle Haggard died, I did what fans do in such times: I broke out his recordings and relistened. I heard something I hadn’t noticed before: Merle prophesied the rise of Donald Trump and the Tea Party. It’s all in his songs. Through the 1960s and then beyond, he showed us a worsening disenfranchisement among the working class, and more particularly, among blue-collar white men.

Videos

Stories of the Herald-Leader press

Brothers Scotty and Gary Mitchell, who have helped print for the Lexington Herald-Leader for over 40 years, describe the history of the press in the Midland Avenue building and how generations of their family were involved with maintaining it.
Marcus Dorsey mdorsey@herald-leader.com
Stories of the Herald-Leader press 2:00

Stories of the Herald-Leader press

Really, Really Free Market 0:55

Really, Really Free Market

Devin Booker on how to shoot free throws 0:46

Devin Booker on how to shoot free throws

Devin Booker and Malik Monk shooting demonstration 1:11

Devin Booker and Malik Monk shooting demonstration