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Bevin's hunt for Beshear misdeeds is getting pricey

Bevin pledges to 'clean up' Beshear's mess

Gov. Matt Bevin summarizes his next steps after he outlined alleged financial irregularities in the Beshear administration. /By Jack Brammer
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Gov. Matt Bevin summarizes his next steps after he outlined alleged financial irregularities in the Beshear administration. /By Jack Brammer

Republican Matt Bevin has served as Kentucky’s governor for two years and seven months — more than half of a four-year term.

Bevin’s appointees lead state government’s agencies and offices, and fill many mid-level management positions.

You’d think that by now they would have sniffed out any corruption, waste, fraud or abuse left over from the previous administration.

Yet, Bevin is re-upping a $500,000 contract with an Indianapolis law firm to investigate the administration of former Gov. Steve Beshear, whose son, Attorney General Andy Beshear, recently became the first Democratic candidate in next year’s race for governor.

By the end of the contract, Kentucky taxpayers could pay the firm of Taft Stettinius & Hollister $1 million. 

The firm’s first report issued in 2017 was underwhelming. It resulted in two individuals admitting that they committed ethics violations by soliciting political contributions from state employees. Mostly what the state got for its money was a compilation of facts that had been uncovered by federal investigators or journalists.

As a result of the FBI’s work and U.S. Attorney’s prosecution, a high-ranking member of both Beshears’ administrations, Tim Longmeyer, is in federal prison for pocketing kickbacks from contractors; Longmeyer directed part of his ill-gotten gains into Democratic political coffers. A lobbyist was recently convicted of bribing Longmeyer.

If Bevin or others have evidence (or even suspicions) of wrongdoing, they should report what they know to the FBI, federal prosecutors or Kentucky State Police. 

If Bevin’s just fishing for dirt on a political rival, his campaign — not taxpayers — should pay for that.

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