Business

Want to save money and reduce food waste? Eat the ugly stuff.

Misfits Markets, a produce delivery service, launched this week in Kentucky. The company sells less-than-perfect fruits and vegetables at reduced prices.
Misfits Markets, a produce delivery service, launched this week in Kentucky. The company sells less-than-perfect fruits and vegetables at reduced prices.

Everybody knows that eating fruits and vegetables is good for you. But Americans are surprisingly finicky about which ones they buy.

According to the EPA, almost 40 million tons of food waste are generated every year. One way to fight that: Eat the ugly fruit and veggies.

Misfits Market, a delivery service, on Monday launched delivery in Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois. The company will send you a box of less-than-perfect produce at what it says is well below grocery store or farmers’ market prices.

A small box, with 10-12 pounds of mixed fruits and vegetables is $22 plus $5 for shipping; a large box, with 18-22 pounds, is $35 plus $5 for shipping.

Boxes will have a variety of seasonal produce and can be purchased on a one-time basis or by subscription, according to a company news release.

According to the company, since its founding in 2018, Philadelphia-based Misfits Market has rescued more than 10 million pounds of produce that would have otherwise gone to waste. “The company’s mission is to bring delicious, fresh, and affordable misfit produce to people everywhere and reduce food waste at a scale that creates positive and lasting impact,” according to the release.

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Misfits Market sells organic produce but it doesn’t guarantee the fruits and vegetables are locally sourced, which means they could be competition for Kentucky growers, who also will sell cosmetically challenged produce at reduced prices. Photo provided

All the produce is certified organic and non-GMO, according to Misfits Market.

But it does not guarantee to be locally produced, which means that the service could be in direct competition with Kentucky growers, such as those at the Lexington Farmers Market, who often also sell cosmetically challenged produce at reduced prices.

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