Fayette County

Hepatitis A cases in Kentucky top 1,000. Has the outbreak hit Lexington, nearby counties?

ABCs of hepatitis: What’s the difference between A, B, C?

Hepatitis is a disease characterized by inflammation of the liver. It comes in many forms, including hepatitis A, B and C. But what do those letter designations mean, and how do they differ from one another?
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Hepatitis is a disease characterized by inflammation of the liver. It comes in many forms, including hepatitis A, B and C. But what do those letter designations mean, and how do they differ from one another?

There have been 1,094 cases of Hepatitis A in a Kentuckywide outbreak, but Fayette and surrounding counties have mostly escaped the worst of the the sickness, according to new numbers released from the Kentucky Department for Public Health.

Almost half of those cases (525) occurred in Jefferson County. Areas in northeast Kentucky, including Greenup, Boyd and Carter counties have also been hit hard by the outbreak.

But in Fayette County, and other areas of Central Kentucky, Hepatitis A has mostly been absent. In Fayette County, there have been just six 6 cases reported to the state since August, and all of its neighboring counties have reported few or no cases.

In May, one case was confirmed at Lexington’s Millcreek Elementary School.

Fifty-four percent of the counties in the state have had at least one Hepatitis A case since August and statewide, eight people have died from the infection, the health department said. (See a complete list of how many cases occurred in each county.)

Several Kentucky cases have been linked to contact and outbreaks in other states, including California, Michigan and Utah, according to the health department. The primary risk factors are homelessness and illicit drug use, and the outbreak is believed to be occurring through person-to-person contact.

Symptoms of Hepatitis A include fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, abdominal discomfort, dark urine and yellowing of the skin and eyes.

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