Fayette County

How pizza is helping pave potholes in Lexington

How potholes are formed

In the winter, potholes are a constant challenge for drivers. This video from the Utah Department of Transportation shows how potholes form because of winter weather.
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In the winter, potholes are a constant challenge for drivers. This video from the Utah Department of Transportation shows how potholes form because of winter weather.

Domino’s Pizza is donating $5,000 to help Lexington repair potholes this spring.

The donation is part of a national “Paving for Pizza” campaign Domino’s launched last year. Lexington is the only city in Kentucky to receive a Domino’s Paving for Pizza grant.

“The program originally included only 20 grants,” said Danielle Bulger, a spokeswoman for Domino’s Pizza. “To date we have awarded 36 grants in the U.S.”

“We received so many nominations that we decided to expand the program to give away 50 grants — one for each state,” Bulger said.

Someone from the Lexington area nominated the city as part of the program, Bulger said.

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Domino’s Pizza has donated $5,000 to the city of Lexington to repair potholes. It’s part of a much larger “Paving for Pizza” campaign across the country. Domino's Pizza

If Lexington accepts the money, it must film or photograph at least two “before” and “after” pothole repairs. Those photos will then be used by Domino’s in its advertising. The city must complete all pothole repairs by June 28.

Rob Allen, director of Lexington’s streets and roads department, said this is the first time a private company has donated money to help pay for pothole repairs.

“We are thrilled,” Allen said. “We fix thousands of potholes a year. There’s not strings attached other than publicity.”

How many potholes will $5,000 fix? It depends on the size of the pothole.

“It could be dozens of small potholes,” Allen said. “Or it could be a major repair at an intersection that could take the majority of that money.”

Asphalt costs roughly $110 a ton.

The city repairs potholes year-round but ramps up plugging holes in pavement on April 1, when winter is over and the asphalt plants reopen.

“We do about 6,400 pothole repairs a year,” Allen said.

The $5,000 donation still must be approved by the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Council. It will be discussed at a council work session later Tuesday.

The council won’t take a final vote on the $5,000 donation until Feb. 21.

Beth Musgrave has covered government and politics for the Herald-Leader for more than a decade. A graduate of Northwestern University, she has worked as a reporter in Kentucky, Indiana, Mississippi, Illinois and Washington D.C.


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