Fayette County

A case of Hepatitis A has been confirmed at another Lexington restaurant

ABCs of hepatitis: What’s the difference between A, B, C?

Hepatitis is a disease characterized by inflammation of the liver. It comes in many forms, including hepatitis A, B and C. But what do those letter designations mean, and how do they differ from one another?
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Hepatitis is a disease characterized by inflammation of the liver. It comes in many forms, including hepatitis A, B and C. But what do those letter designations mean, and how do they differ from one another?

An employee at Roosters restaurant in Lexington has been diagnosed with hepatitis A.

The Lexington-Fayette County Health Department said Friday that customers who ate at the restaurant at 124 Marketplace Drive on Tuesday might have been exposed and should get a vaccination.

The sick employee will stay off work until he or she is cleared to return, the health department said.

Health inspectors have worked with Roosters to make sure it has been properly cleaned, and the health department said it will be working with the restaurant to make sure its employees receive vaccinations.

The health department said “it is relatively uncommon for restaurant customers to become infected with the hepatitis A virus due to an infected food handler.”

But because the number of hepatitis A cases in the region has continued to climb, the health department is still recommending that everyone in the community be vaccinated for hepatitis A.

Good hand washing is also important in preventing the spread of the liver disease, which is usually spread when someone eats or drinks something contaminated by small amounts of the stool from an infected person.

Symptoms include “fatigue, decreased appetite, stomach pain, nausea, darkened urine, pail stools and jaundice,” and may appear 15 to 50 days after exposure to the virus, according to the health department.

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