Fayette County

New Circle Road’s rogue goat adjusts to new home, motherhood

Rogue goat Taser now a mother

The rogue goat that snarled New Circle Road traffic and evaded police for several hours in October has found a home — and has become a mother.
Up Next
The rogue goat that snarled New Circle Road traffic and evaded police for several hours in October has found a home — and has become a mother.

The rogue goat that snarled New Circle Road traffic and evaded police for several hours in October has found a home — and has become a mother.

The goat managed avoid being hit by a car or being charged with evading police during her run Oct. 7, but she was finally subdued with a Taser by Lexington police on Dunkirk Drive.

Bobby Lail and his wife, both of Lexington, saw the Herald-Leader article the next day about the goat’s time on the lam and decided they had to adopt her and bring her to their farm. They named her Taser.

At the time, the shelter listed Taser as a male, Lail said. They soon found out that the goat was a female, but their two male goats were castrated, so the owners weren’t worried about her getting pregnant.

But as Taser began to settle in her large pen at the Lails’ farm in Fayette County, they noticed that her stomach was getting bigger.

They thought it was her healthy appetite for alfalfa that was causing her growth, but in the early morning on Dec. 11, Lail noticed that Taser didn’t come to the gate with the two other goats.

It was dark outside, but Lail could see Taser looking at him from the goats’ shelter.

“Then when I went to drive off, I saw a little shadow run across,” Lail said.

The Lails, who had no idea she was pregnant, discovered that Taser had given birth to two kid goats, one black and one white.

Gestation for a goat is five months, so Taser was pregnant when she was subdued with the stun gun, Lail said.

The kid goats are healthy despite their mother’s adventure in October, Lail said.

Lail said he isn’t sure yet of the kid goats’ genders. But the white one is curious, smart and agile, Lail said, and his wife told him that one must be a girl.

The kid goats’ day generally consists of eating, sleeping and then running around at high speed, Lail said. They especially like to bolt full-tilt at trees, run up the trunk and then flip to the ground.

Taser and the kids share a pen with the Lails’ two other rescue goats, Baba and Drag.

Drag is an elderly goat that used to calm horses in the stables at Keeneland, Lail said.

Baba’s mother died while pregnant with him, but a vet was able to rescue him. The Lails adopted him and raised him on a bottle.

The kid goats often try to play with energetic Baba, but Taser head-butts him when he’s near them, Lail said. She seems to trust the older, calmer Drag with the kids.

Lail said the young goats, although unexpected, are fun to have around.

“It’s amazing how entertaining they are,” Lail said. “They can almost talk sometimes when they start hollering.”

  Comments