Crime

“We hold no hatred.” Chef’s family reacts to new manslaughter charge against driver

Remembering Chef Robert Myers

Kim Brown speaks about what it was like to work with Chef Robert Myers at Lexington Country Club. Myers, 56, died after a two-vehicle crash.
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Kim Brown speaks about what it was like to work with Chef Robert Myers at Lexington Country Club. Myers, 56, died after a two-vehicle crash.

Six months after the crash that killed Lexington Country Club executive chef Robert Myers, a Fayette County grand jury has indicted a driver on a manslaughter charge.

Marisol Lewis, 39, of Lexington was indicted Tuesday on a charge of second-degree manslaughter. The indictment says Lewis “wantonly operated a motor vehicle” and caused the death of Myers, 56, of Perryville. The Lewis vehicle hit the rear of the vehicle Myers drove, police said at the time.

Fayette Commonwealth’s Attorney Lou Anna Red Corn said Wednesday she could not comment on the factors that led a grand jury to find that Lewis had wantonly operated a vehicle. Lexington police said at the time of the crash that speed was considered a factor in the wreck.

The crash happened shortly after 10:30 p.m. July 4 in an outbound lane of Versailles Road at Man o’ War Boulevard near Clubhouse Lane and Keeneland Race Course, Lexington police said at the time. The wreck temporarily shut down Versailles Road near Man o’ War Boulevard.

Fayette court records indicate that Lewis pleaded guilty in 2010 to speeding 14 mph over the speed limit and paid $171 in fines and court costs.

Myers, the father of eight children, was known for his salt-risen bread, which he made in a wood-fired brick oven at his home in Perryville.

Irene Myers, the wife of Robert Myers, said in a statement Wednesday: “I would like the driver to know that we hold no hatred against her, and hope she will seek Christ’s forgiveness and grace.

“Our family has been overwhelmed by the kindness and generosity of many though our hearts still ache at the loss of Robert.”

The death of Myers devastated the staff at the country club, which set up a memorial with flowers, a cookie, carrot cake, a bottle of Ale-8-One and a sheet of signed goodbyes on the prep table where Myers often worked.

Lewis is scheduled to be arraigned Jan. 19 before Fayette Circuit Judge Thomas Travis. Second-degree manslaughter is a Class C felony punishable by five to 10 years in prison.

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