Education

On total eclipse day, Corbin students will be learning from home

Mr. Eclipse shares the beauty and importance of experiencing totality

Fred Espenak, scientist emeritus at NASA Goddard, visited Hopkinsville to help promote and educate about the August 2017 total solar eclipse.
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Fred Espenak, scientist emeritus at NASA Goddard, visited Hopkinsville to help promote and educate about the August 2017 total solar eclipse.

Corbin, in southeastern Kentucky, will be outside the main path of the Aug. 21 total eclipse, when the moon completely covers the sun and casts a shadow on the Earth.

Nevertheless, Corbin Schools won’t be in session. It will be a non-traditional instruction day for students to learn from home, Superintendent David Cox said.

After conferring with the school board, Cox said he decided to not hold classes that day because of a safety concern.

“About the time that the eclipse will be in full force is about the time we will be dismissing,” he said. “Kids know not to look at the sun, but during the eclipse, everyone wants to look up and see.

“We have 3,000 students, so trying to monitor 3,000 students while you are in dismissal or on the bus was going to be a bit of safety issue.”

A non-traditional instruction day counts as a regular attendance day in the school calendar and doesn’t have to be made up later in the year. Online curriculum will be available to students, Cox said.

“Our focus of instruction will be on the eclipse and the solar system, kind of a thematic unit in all subject areas for that day,” he said.

Several districts in Western Kentucky, including Warren and Christian counties, will not have classes on Aug. 21.

School districts across the South are split on whether to be in session.

Nashville Public Schools initially decided to close but then reversed that decision. On the other hand, Knoxville and Clarksville, Tenn., schools will be closed.

This will be the first time since 1918 that a total eclipse will travel across the entire country. The main path of totality will begin in Oregon and end in South Carolina.

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