Education

Christ the King School named a 2017 National Blue Ribbon School

Sayre Lower School art teacher Georgia Henkel, center, and third-graders Dougie Christopher, left, and Brogann Thomas wheat-pasted Lexington’s first public mural celebrating Lexington women of historical significance on the side of a building.
Sayre Lower School art teacher Georgia Henkel, center, and third-graders Dougie Christopher, left, and Brogann Thomas wheat-pasted Lexington’s first public mural celebrating Lexington women of historical significance on the side of a building. Photo provided

Awards/honors

▪ Christ the King School has been recognized as a 2017 National Blue Ribbon School by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos. Based on all student scores, subgroup student scores and graduation rates, Christ the King is honored in the exemplary high performing schools category, as measured by state assessments or nationally normed tests. Christ the King was first recognized as a National Blue Ribbon School in 2005.

Miscellaneous

▪ Third-grade Sayre students have created the first public mural celebrating Lexington women of historical significance who represented innovation, courage and intelligence.

“The Lexington community has dealt directly with the issue and placement of the confederate monuments that are currently located in Cheapside Plaza. As part of the conversation, Council Member Jennifer Mossotti brought to the attention of the Urban County Council that while Lexington has plenty of statues of men, horses and even a camel, there are none of women,” said Lower School art teacher Georgia Henkel.

“When the third-grade teachers asked students how they could bring art into their study of Lexington, it was clear that they could see the need for more public art representing women,” Henkel said, “and it didn’t take long for these wise young artists to conclude that they could change that.”

The 16-by-9 mural features three outspoken crusaders for civil rights including Mary Ellen Britton, a black woman who became the first female physician in Lexington; Madeline McDowell Breckinridge, a progressive reformer and leader of the women’s suffrage movement; and the wife of President Abraham Lincoln, Mary Todd Lincoln, who supported her husband and the Union to abolish slavery, even though her brothers served in the Confederacy and her parents were slaveholders.

The Sayre student mural is wheat-pasted on a downtown Lexington building at the corner of Eastern Avenue and Third Street.

▪ More than 245 seniors from Burgin Independent and Mercer County High School participated in the third annual Senior Seminar Day Sept. 21 with local industry. Harrodsburg/Mercer County Industrial Development Authority Executive Director Dick Webb developed and organized the event, assisted by more than 35 community agency personnel. Since the inception of the event in 2015, more than 600 students in Mercer County and Burgin schools have participated.

▪ Morehead State University students and faculty are helping to develop small satellites and track spacecraft in deep space, and the program is getting plenty of attention. MSU Space Science was recently featured at the International Astronautical Congress meeting in Adelaide, Australia.

▪ Phil Vischer, co-creator of VeggieTales and founder of Big Idea Productions, will speak at Campbellsville University twice on Oct. 18. Vischer will speak at 10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. in Ransdell Chapel at 401 North Hoskins Avenue. His free addresses are open to the public.

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