Politics & Government

Lawmakers want their documents dated with ‘in the Year of Our Lord’

State Sen. Albert Robinson, R-London, sponsored the Senate resolution to add the phrase “The Year of Our Lord” to legislative documents.
State Sen. Albert Robinson, R-London, sponsored the Senate resolution to add the phrase “The Year of Our Lord” to legislative documents. Legislative Research Commission

On the last day of this year’s legislative session, the Senate and House quietly approved resolutions to make sure their documents are dated with the phrase “in the Year of Our Lord.”

“It’s important for us to go back to the basics of our U.S. and state constitutions that used that phrase. I’m also trying anywhere and everywhere I can to respect our creator,” said state Sen. Albert Robinson, R-London, who sponsored the Senate measure.

Both measures, House Resolution 218 and Senate Resolution 294, were approved by voice vote in the final hours of the 2017 General Assembly on March 30.

The resolutions say the House and Senate shall include “in the Year of our Lord” in the adopted date of all the chambers’ simple resolutions and floor citations.

The resolutions note that the phrase is found in the U.S. and Kentucky constitutions, and in other historic documents, such as in President Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 and in President William Howard Taft’s Thanksgiving Day proclamation in 1909.

The resolutions also note that Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin signs all proclamations, including his proclamation last December declaring 2017 to be the Year of the Bible in Kentucky, with the phrase “in the Year of Our Lord.”

Amber Duke, communications director for ACLU of Kentucky, said she had no comment on the resolutions.

Frank Lovell Jr., a member of Louisville Atheists and Freethinkers, said the measures are unnecessary.

“They only serve sectarian purposes. They meet no secular need,” he said.

Jack Brammer: 502-227-1198, @BGPolitics

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