Politics & Government

Kentucky State Parks cashing in on solar eclipse

Awaiting Totality: Hopkinsville's time to shine comes after the sky goes dark

On August 21, 2017, a solar eclipse will sweep across America, with the point of greatest eclipse being just outside of Hopkinsville, Ky. In this teaser video, we introduce the town and events surround this celestial event. Music by The Pilgrim Pr
Up Next
On August 21, 2017, a solar eclipse will sweep across America, with the point of greatest eclipse being just outside of Hopkinsville, Ky. In this teaser video, we introduce the town and events surround this celestial event. Music by The Pilgrim Pr

Kentucky state resort parks are cashing in on the Aug. 21 total solar eclipse.

The state expects to take in more than $250,000 in additional revenue by increasing lodging rates at six resort parks in Western Kentucky — Kentucky Dam Village near Gilbertsville, Kenlake near Hardin, Lake Barkley near Cadiz, Pennyrile Forest near Dawson Springs, Barren River near Lucas and Rough River near Falls of Rough. Kentucky has 17 resort parks.

The state Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet, which oversees the state parks, noted in information provided at the Lexington Herald-Leader’s request that the parks will also incur more costs than usual as staff work long hours to handle crowds, serve food and provide security.

The Hopkinsville area is the point of greatest eclipse, and depending on the weather, could offer the best view of the phenomenon.

The average daily rate for lodge rooms at the six resort parks in the days leading up to the eclipse is $168, up from $86 for the same Friday-through-Tuesday period last year.

For cottages at the parks, the average daily rate is $227 this year, compared to $149 last year.

There are no rooms available on Sunday night at any of the six resorts. Some rooms remain available for the weekend and Monday night.

Tourism officials said the state can change lodging rates at state resort parks at any time for any reason.

Jen Winter of Daystar Filters describes the steps and planning involved with successful total eclipse photography like the one passing over the United States on August 21, 2017.

If you are planning on shooting the eclipse with your smart phone, here are a few tips about using the approved solar eclipse glasses to ensure your safety, the safety of your phone and better photos.

Fred Espenak, scientist emeritus at NASA Goddard, visited Hopkinsville to help promote and educate about the August 2017 total solar eclipse.

Never look directly at the sun's rays. When watching a partial eclipse you must wear eclipse glasses at all times or use another indirect method if you want to face the sun. During a total eclipse when the moon completely obscures the sun, it is s

Related stories from Lexington Herald Leader

  Comments