Kentucky

You may want to grab Kentucky bourbon to read this. Drinking is bad for you, study finds

Julian Van Winkle smelled a glass a bottle of Pappy Van Winkle 20-year-old bourbon at the Buffalo Trace Distillery in Frankfort Ky., Wednesday, June 19, 2013. Julian Van Winkle, III is the third generation Van Winkle to be involved in the Kentucky Bourbon whiskey business. His grandfather, who was known as "Pappy", started the family in the business back in the 1890s. Julian now has his whiskey produced for him under his grandfather's original wheated bourbon recipe, and ages and bottles the Old Rip Van Winkle brands in Frankfort, Kentucky. Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff
Julian Van Winkle smelled a glass a bottle of Pappy Van Winkle 20-year-old bourbon at the Buffalo Trace Distillery in Frankfort Ky., Wednesday, June 19, 2013. Julian Van Winkle, III is the third generation Van Winkle to be involved in the Kentucky Bourbon whiskey business. His grandfather, who was known as "Pappy", started the family in the business back in the 1890s. Julian now has his whiskey produced for him under his grandfather's original wheated bourbon recipe, and ages and bottles the Old Rip Van Winkle brands in Frankfort, Kentucky. Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff Herald-Leader

Moderate drinking won’t harm you, some medical leaders have said previously. But a new study disputes that claim and spells out how alcohol kills.

It may be particularly hard to hear in Kentucky where bourbon is an $8.5 billion industry.

According to the report published in the Lancet medical journal, alcohol led to 2.8 million deaths globally in 2016 and was the seventh leading risk factor for death. The 2.8 million deaths equates to 6.8 percent of all male deaths in 2016 and 2.2 percent of all female deaths, the report shows.

Researchers at the Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation based their analysis on nearly 700 studies on drinking and 600 studies on alcohol and health. The authors called it “the most comprehensive estimate of the global burden of alcohol use to date.”

For people over the age of 50, cancers were the leading cause of alcohol-related deaths, and for those ages 15 to 49, tuberculosis, self-harm and road injuries were the top causes of alcohol-related deaths, the study showed.

“The conclusions of this study are clear and unambiguous: alcohol is a colossal global health issue,” the author of the study said.

The study showed about 1 in 3 people drink alcohol; men consuming 1.7 drinks each day and women an average of 0.73 drinks per day. There are much higher risks for disease and death with more drinks consumed, according to the study.

Those who had two drinks per day had a 7 percent higher risk for death than non-drinkers. And for those people who have five drinks per day, the risk was 37 percent higher.

Before the Lancet study, drinking alcohol was touted as a route to better health.

According to a 2016 Mayo Clinic article, moderate drinking could reduce risk of developing and dying from heart disease, possibly reduce the risk of diabetes and ischemic stroke.

Additional studies from the American Diabetes Association and the American Cancer Society have supported claims that moderate drinking can offer benefits.

Guidelines for moderate drinking are one drink a day for women of all ages and men older than age 65 and up to two drinks a day for men age 65 or younger.

But not so fast, said the authors of the new study.

“The widely held view of the health benefits of alcohol needs revising, particularly as improved methods and analysis continue to show how much alcohol use contributes to global death and disability,” according to the study. “Our results show that the safest level of drinking is none.”

Barton 1792 provided the Herald-Leader with footage of its repair process. In June and then July, the bourbon distillery faced massive collapses resulting in broken barrels of whiskey.

  Comments