Editorials

Paul’s cynical cry: party before country

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., smiles at the crowd during his victory celebration, Nov. 8, 2016, in Louisville, Ky.
Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., smiles at the crowd during his victory celebration, Nov. 8, 2016, in Louisville, Ky. AP

Rand Paul, who gained a U.S. Senate seat from Kentucky as a Tea Party candidate running on the Republican ticket, has now officially and fully joined his adopted party.

Unfortunately, he announced his cynical conversion by making it clear he places party, and possibly his next presidential bid, before — way before — country.

While other Republicans, in light of questions about contacts between President Donald Trump’s recently ousted national security adviser Michael Flynn and Russia, were calling for an investigation into the administration’s relationship with Russia, Paul brushed off the idea.

“I just don’t think it’s useful to be doing investigation after investigation, particularly of your own party,” Paul said.

So, if a Democrat were cozying up to Russia, perhaps breaking the law by discussing lifting sanctions imposed by the sitting president before his or her guy was even sworn in, that would be worth investigating? But if a Republican does the same thing?

Ah, what a bore.

Of course, Paul has more pressing matters to attend to, like being sure hundreds of thousands of his constituents — and millions of Americans — lose health care.

“We’ll never even get started with doing the things we need to do, like repealing Obamacare, if we’re spending our whole time having Republicans investigate Republicans,” Paul moaned.

“It makes no sense,” Paul said.

Agreed.

  Comments