Letters to the Editor

Lesson from Alabama on party-line voting

Sen. Doug Jones, D-Ala., took the oath of office during a mock swearing in ceremony in the Old Senate Chamber on Jan. 3. He won a special election in a Republican-dominated state against retired judge Roy Moore, who faced sexual harassment allegations.
Sen. Doug Jones, D-Ala., took the oath of office during a mock swearing in ceremony in the Old Senate Chamber on Jan. 3. He won a special election in a Republican-dominated state against retired judge Roy Moore, who faced sexual harassment allegations. Associated Press

Putting party aside is something many Americans struggle with. But all that’s done is box us in.

I’m fiscally conservative and socially liberal. Although I’m a registered Democrat, there is no party to which I can fully align my pragmatic philosophies. Oftentimes in voting seasons, I have to sacrifice one portion of my beliefs in order to bring to fruition the other.

A Reuters article cited a citizen of Alabama who in the December special election had to “hold her nose and vote Democrat.” And people need to know that that’s OK.

The Alabama election gives me both pause and hope. Pause, because there is still finger pointing going on, and hope because some Americans did put ethics over party.

What we can learn from Alabama is that the values we share outweigh the beliefs that separate us. I love Kentucky and its people. I would not choose to live any other place.

I know that socially I am a blue dot in a red sea, but instead of that knowledge dividing me from my neighbors and friends, I use it to incite conversation and participate in authentic discourse, which I hope our forefathers would be proud of.

Megan Berketis

Danville

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