Letters to the Editor

‘A turning point in history.’ Letters to the editor on the Mueller report.

The Mueller investigation into possible Russia - Trump campaign connection

Robert Mueller is special counsel for the Department of Justice. He oversees the investigation into Russia's possible connections to the 2016 election and Trump campaign.
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Robert Mueller is special counsel for the Department of Justice. He oversees the investigation into Russia's possible connections to the 2016 election and Trump campaign.

Trump’s actions impeachable

The Mueller report confirms what we’ve always known: President Donald Trump abused his authority, refused to uphold the Constitution and the law as he pledged when inaugurated, violated the law, and tried repeatedly to obstruct justice. He continues to put our nation in danger by refusing to maintain security clearance protocols. These are impeachable offenses.

If Attorney General William Barr has proven anything, it’s that he’s a political operative whose priority is protecting Trump, not our democracy. It’s up to Congress to do what the AG will not.

I urge Rep. Andy Barr to support impeachment hearings immediately and cosponsor Rep. Rashida Tlaib’s resolution (House Resolution 257) that would instruct the Judiciary Committee to begin investigating whether Trump should be impeached. We need public testimony so that there will be no dispute.

Also another pressing and obvious next action is to impeach William Barr for lying, discussing findings with the White House prior to releasing it publicly or even to Congress, and misrepresenting the Mueller report. This is all abnormal, unlawful conduct for the nation’s highest legal authority.

Diane Cahill, Lexington

Time for Congress to investigate

In elementary arithmetic we are taught that one-half plus one-half equals one whole.

The Executive Summary to Volume II of the Mueller report lays out the facts of several issues and events relative to obstruction of justice by the president or his campaign. Those issues include the president directing subordinates to make false statements, his interference with ongoing investigations by intelligence agencies, intimidation of the FBI director and attorney general, suggestion of future pardons, and so on.

Any of those efforts could be called halves or other fractions of an obstruction of justice. Do all those fractions not add up to at least one whole conspiracy? I think they do.

I am not a prosecutor, but Special Counsel Robert Mueller seems to lay out clear and compelling evidence that multiple obstructions were committed by President Donald Trump. Mueller, however, bowed to internal Department of Justice guidelines against indicting a sitting president and declined to seek prosecution of those obstructions. Significantly, he goes on to essentially invite Congress to do further investigation. I call on our congressional leaders to do just that.

Arthur T. LaBar, Richmond

A pivotal time

As the anti-Trump forces spin their collective liberal wheels, denying Americans a border-security wall, wasting precious legislative time and generally pitching a fit, it’s important for any sane voter to evaluate the direction of our country in the coming years: Should we open the floodgate to most abortions at the expense of a human life? Attempt to provide health care/citizenship and benefits to anyone crossing our border?

We are at a turning point in history. Let’s not let young, arrogant neo-socialism get a foothold. History has proven this philosophy damaged, dangerous and destructive.

John Mackey, Lexington

‘Persecution’ no excuse

Whether President Donald Trump’s feelings are or are not sincere, they do not justify obstruction of justice. It is a dangerous precedent to forgive obstruction of justice because someone sincerely thinks they have a right to do so, because they feel persecuted. Nearly every person under scrutiny and facing possible criminal indictment whether truly guilty or entirely innocent may feel persecuted. If any of us were to obstruct justice and use the defense that we felt “persecuted”, the judge would likely laugh, slam the gavel down, and yield the verdict of guilty.

Trump knew and was warned on several occasions that he was obstructing justice. If Trump cannot control his passions to the point of committing criminal offenses or is insane, he is unfit for office.

Trump in literal deed intended to do anything he could to stop or interfere with the investigation, and the fact that he appointed Attorney General William Barr is the proof. Trump hired an ally to protect him from justice and this was witnessed by all that watched Barr’s press briefing, whether some admit it or not. The Mueller report yielded that the only reason obstruction failed was because people Trump ordered to obstruct justice refused to do so.

Robert Moreland, Lexington



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