Letters to the Editor

Letters: Support for Maximum Security, lawsuit; do addicts think Cocaine Mitch is funny?

The historic and dramatic aftermath of Kentucky Derby 145, from disqualification to appeals

After Maximum Security and Luis Saez were disqualified from the 2019 Kentucky Derby victory, the allegations, appeals and discussion surrounding the objection continued. Here is a timeline of the Kentucky Derby aftermath. (Music: www.bensound.com)
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After Maximum Security and Luis Saez were disqualified from the 2019 Kentucky Derby victory, the allegations, appeals and discussion surrounding the objection continued. Here is a timeline of the Kentucky Derby aftermath. (Music: www.bensound.com)

Maximum Security should have won

As a female jockey in the late ’70s, I didn’t have a lot of opportunity to ride live mounts, but I could and still can analyze a race. Kentucky Derby winner Maximum Security shouldn’t have been disqualified and I hope jockey Luis Saez and owners Gary and Mary West win in court.

War of Will drifted out from the rail entering the home stretch. That’s why he was behind Maximum Security. As a result, War of Will almost clipped Maximum Security’s hind legs five times, which could have caused an awful spill. Then Country House on the outside, who got put up as the winner, drifted in and started an accordion effect, squeezing Bodexpress, Long Range Toddy and War of Will.

War of Will should have remained on the rail. Instead, the rider angled for a hole that wasn’t there because Maximum Security occupied that lane. Maximum Security’s jockey immediately corrected his horse and, according to racing bylaws, shouldn’t have been penalized because it wasn’t intentional, reckless or inept.

The elephant on the track was Churchill Downs. All other major U.S. stakes races only allow 14 horses. The 20-horse Derby field was a recipe for mayhem, especially given a sloppy track.

Terri Fann, Lexington

Ann Oldfather, attorney for jockey Luis Saez, gave this Kentucky Derby replay video to Kentucky Horse Racing Commission stewards on Friday. The video was prepared to defend her client against potential disciplinary action by the stewards.

Owner right to sue

I disagree with Herald-Leader writer John Clay’s description of the Gary West NBC’s “Today” show interview as “sour grapes.” Bill Mott is the one who should be labeled the sour grape. The Kentucky Derby has lost its charm. I support Gary West and hope he continues with his lawsuit. And I hope bettors file suit as well. Churchill Downs appears to be run by money managers with no real love of horses or racing. And chief steward Barbara Borden’s statement and refusal to explain herself was pitiful and an embarrassment to Kentucky.

Carol Johnston, Lexington

Kentucky chief steward Barbara Borden describes how she and other stewards came to the conclusion of disqualifying Maximum Security from the win at the 145th Kentucky Derby.

‘Cocaine Mitch’ shirt no joke

I was surprised and outraged when my daughter told me about the Cocaine Mitch T-Shirt that Sen. Mitch McConnell’s 2020 campaign is selling. Apparently, McConnell and his campaign members think this is a great source of humor.

I’m thinking of my old friend, who every morning when she wakes up wonders if her niece has died. Does she think the shirt is funny? I’m thinking of the mothers and fathers who have lost their children to the ravages of drug addiction: Are they laughing about the shirt? I’m thinking of the serious epidemic throughout Appalachia and beyond. Do the citizens see the humor in this shirt? I’m thinking of the overcrowded jails, the exhausted doctors, nurses and social workers who are trying to help their patients. Do they think the shirt is amusing? Do the addicts themselves think the shirt is funny?

It is obvious that McConnell is showing complete disregard for the health and welfare of Kentucky citizens. I wonder if perhaps he is laughing at the agony going on in his home state.

To be making fun of one of the most egregious crises in Appalachia is beyond shameful. It is reprehensible. It certainly is not “humor”.

Diana Nave, Lexington

U.S. consumers paying for tariffs

Economics has been characterized as the dismal science. Certainly this must be the policy of the Trump administration to see how dismal things can be made for citizens. If only people would (or could) understand that tariffs are taxes on American importers, mostly paid by American consumers.

Of course, the federal government is taking in more money, but the money is not coming from China. The increased funds to the federal government are coming from the pockets of American consumers who are faced with fewer choices and who are paying artificially generated higher prices. We will leave the impact of tariffs on employment for another day. The issue seems to be that lack knowledge is not as great a problem as knowing so many things which are wrong.

Charles Myers, Lexington

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