Letters to the Editor

Letters to the editor: Dec. 19

(Somebody?) bless us, every one

Political correctness is running amok. We cannot say “Merry Christmas,” or put nativity scenes in public or refer to Christmas in schools so we do not offend anyone. And now a principal in New York bans any and all reference to Christmas in her school.

My grandson came home from fifth grade today and said they are having a holiday” party in his class.

And I heard about a school that will not allow the “holiday” play to go on unless it takes out all reference to Christmas because one atheist complained. Well, it should be a pretty short play, since it is about the birth of Jesus.

So, to you religion-phobes and anti-religion, anti-Christmas nuts: “Merry Christmas to all, and to all a good night.” And in the words of Tiny Tim, “God Bless us every one.”

Mike Sweeney

Lexington

Philharmonic phabulous

I was happy to discover a review of the Philharmonic’s concert Gloria online. One of Lexington’s music icons, Tedrin Blair Lindsay, expressed judgments that were balanced and supportive.

However, the performance was more than a “mixed bag.” It was otherworldly to hear Lux Aurumque by Whitacre (also known for the virtual choir phenomenon), performed a cappella by the Lexington Chamber Chorale.

I was also moved by the sound of vanishing angel wings, conveyed by a string coda in Tavener’s Song of the Angel. These pieces make up for omitted favorites, such as “He shall feed his flock like a shepherd,” from the Messiah.

That night the cathedral hummed with fellowship and anticipation. A blind woman aided by a walker sat in the second row. A couple in the back listened with their arms around each other. A man in the last row surreptitiously conducted the “Hallelujah Chorus.” The works chosen were edifying, a reminder that each of us can be like an angel.

According to Rich Copley’s preview, Scott Terrell wished “to offer the community more.” He had no doubt the audience would be incredibly moved by the performance. His faith was justified.

Gaby Bedetti

Lexington

Hear black poets

University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto has decided to shroud the mural in Memorial Hall that depicts a romanticized history of our state because we need to confront “the unsettling questions it raises for our sense of community.”

Movements like this are cropping up all around the country to hide our uncomfortable history of racism.

Princeton is renaming buildings that bear President Woodrow Wilson’s name because he was a racist in the early 20th century. We erase these things because they no longer represent our values as a nation.

Just like the Taliban did in 2001 when they destroyed a statue of Buddha in Afghanistan built in AD 554.

Yes, covering a mural is less extreme, but there are still better ways to confront this issue. A few weeks ago, I went to a Lyrical Origami program held by the Student Activities Board which showcased black poets’ voices. Incredibly powerful. That made me think deeper about today’s racism in a way that removing this mural will not.

Instead, this makes me afraid about how far we will go. Will we remove books from the library because they were written by racists? Will we burn them?

Anita Shanker

Lexington

More backbone, Capilouto

More college presidents need to follow the lead of Oklahoma Weslyan University president Everett Piper in telling their miscreant twerps what a college education is really about — learning and becoming a responsible adult. University of Kentucky’s Eli Capilouto needs some backbone.

Raymon Brown

Lexington

Climate change of mind

Thousands and thousands of years ago our planet was experiencing the Ice Age. Then the planet began to warm up. It's taken academia til now to develop a theory on the cause of this global warming. It is man.

Oh, after last winter let's change the name to climate change.

The media reports that a survey of Americans agree with this theory. And we know how accurate these surveys are. Ask Gov. Matt Bevin.

Dave Gravatte

Lexington

Cause, effect?

When can the University of Kentucky football program, which now regularly makes $3.5 million excuses, expect to see honest $3.5 million results?

Chuck Schirmer

Lexington

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