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  • 'I’m not greedy,' says man panhandling on Limestone

    Johnny Adams, who says his wrist injury keeps him from working, often holds a sign on busy streets in Lexington to collect money given to him by passing motorists. “If I get $10 to $15, I’m happy. I put my sign away for the rest of the day. I’m not greedy,” Adams said.

Johnny Adams, who says his wrist injury keeps him from working, often holds a sign on busy streets in Lexington to collect money given to him by passing motorists. “If I get $10 to $15, I’m happy. I put my sign away for the rest of the day. I’m not greedy,” Adams said. cbertram@herald-leader.com
Johnny Adams, who says his wrist injury keeps him from working, often holds a sign on busy streets in Lexington to collect money given to him by passing motorists. “If I get $10 to $15, I’m happy. I put my sign away for the rest of the day. I’m not greedy,” Adams said. cbertram@herald-leader.com

Lexington’s panhandling ban struck down by Kentucky Supreme Court

February 16, 2017 11:46 AM