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'I'll never forgive myself': What happens to parents when kids find loaded guns?

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  • 'I'll never forgive myself': Should parents face charges when kids find loaded guns?

    A child shoots himself or another child in Kentucky once every seven weeks, on average, according to a database created by the Herald-Leader using police reports, news stories, obituaries, social media and other public sources. Law-enforcement officials usually sympathize with the grieving adults who most likely would be held responsible, so cases are quietly closed.

A child shoots himself or another child in Kentucky once every seven weeks, on average, according to a database created by the Herald-Leader using police reports, news stories, obituaries, social media and other public sources. Law-enforcement officials usually sympathize with the grieving adults who most likely would be held responsible, so cases are quietly closed. Marcus Dorsey and John Cheves mdorsey@herald-leader.com
A child shoots himself or another child in Kentucky once every seven weeks, on average, according to a database created by the Herald-Leader using police reports, news stories, obituaries, social media and other public sources. Law-enforcement officials usually sympathize with the grieving adults who most likely would be held responsible, so cases are quietly closed. Marcus Dorsey and John Cheves mdorsey@herald-leader.com

A boy finds his father’s loaded gun. Why doesn’t Dad go to jail when someone dies?

July 21, 2017 9:41 AM

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Can Bevin turn the 'sacred cows' of Kentucky's tax code into hamburger? 2:01

Can Bevin turn the 'sacred cows' of Kentucky's tax code into hamburger?

Kentucky offers the 'best incentive in the film industry' 1:46

Kentucky offers the 'best incentive in the film industry'

'I'll never forgive myself': What happens to parents when kids find loaded guns? 3:28

'I'll never forgive myself': What happens to parents when kids find loaded guns?

Watch clips from some of the movies and shows Kentucky taxpayers helped fund 1:33

Watch clips from some of the movies and shows Kentucky taxpayers helped fund

Eddie Gran: You never think you’re going to get waxed 1:45

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Kevin Knox: UK's cramping, perimeter shooting will be addressed 1:31

Kevin Knox: UK's cramping, perimeter shooting will be addressed

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How a Lexington-based business makes movies go viral 1:18

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  • Can Bevin turn the 'sacred cows' of Kentucky's tax code into hamburger?

    Each year, Kentucky gives away more tax revenue through loopholes and incentive programs than it actually collects. Gov. Matt Bevin promised earlier this year to turn some of these "sacred cows" of Kentucky's tax code into hamburger, but that's easier said than done. Here's why.