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Kentucky basketball reacts to ESPN analyst’s criticism 1:39

Kentucky basketball reacts to ESPN analyst’s criticism

Bevin takes aim at Lexington and Louisville school leaders in budget speech 1:59

Bevin takes aim at Lexington and Louisville school leaders in budget speech

The Mill Bakery 0:52

The Mill Bakery

Zion Williamson 'ready to make that decision' 1:06

Zion Williamson 'ready to make that decision'

So what happened to Kentucky at South Carolina? 0:41

So what happened to Kentucky at South Carolina?

What happens when the government shuts down? 1:38

What happens when the government shuts down?

Florida is good, but John Calipari is more concerned about his team 1:47

Florida is good, but John Calipari is more concerned about his team

Matt Bevin explains why he wants to cut all funding for 70 programs 1:44

Matt Bevin explains why he wants to cut all funding for 70 programs

'Disagreement between two neighbors.' Hear from attorney for man accused of attacking Rand Paul. 0:57

'Disagreement between two neighbors.' Hear from attorney for man accused of attacking Rand Paul.

Celebrating 40 years: Rupp Arena, an 'icon' 4:07

Celebrating 40 years: Rupp Arena, an 'icon'

  • Can Bevin turn the 'sacred cows' of Kentucky's tax code into hamburger?

    Each year, Kentucky gives away more tax revenue through loopholes and incentive programs than it actually collects. Gov. Matt Bevin promised earlier this year to turn some of these "sacred cows" of Kentucky's tax code into hamburger, but that's easier said than done. Here's why.

Each year, Kentucky gives away more tax revenue through loopholes and incentive programs than it actually collects. Gov. Matt Bevin promised earlier this year to turn some of these "sacred cows" of Kentucky's tax code into hamburger, but that's easier said than done. Here's why. Daniel Desrochers and Caitlyn Stroh ddesrochers@herald-leader.com
Each year, Kentucky gives away more tax revenue through loopholes and incentive programs than it actually collects. Gov. Matt Bevin promised earlier this year to turn some of these "sacred cows" of Kentucky's tax code into hamburger, but that's easier said than done. Here's why. Daniel Desrochers and Caitlyn Stroh ddesrochers@herald-leader.com

Closing this tax loophole would bring Kentucky billions. Will you have to pay more?

November 09, 2017 09:22 AM

More Videos

Kentucky basketball reacts to ESPN analyst’s criticism 1:39

Kentucky basketball reacts to ESPN analyst’s criticism

Bevin takes aim at Lexington and Louisville school leaders in budget speech 1:59

Bevin takes aim at Lexington and Louisville school leaders in budget speech

The Mill Bakery 0:52

The Mill Bakery

Zion Williamson 'ready to make that decision' 1:06

Zion Williamson 'ready to make that decision'

So what happened to Kentucky at South Carolina? 0:41

So what happened to Kentucky at South Carolina?

What happens when the government shuts down? 1:38

What happens when the government shuts down?

Florida is good, but John Calipari is more concerned about his team 1:47

Florida is good, but John Calipari is more concerned about his team

Matt Bevin explains why he wants to cut all funding for 70 programs 1:44

Matt Bevin explains why he wants to cut all funding for 70 programs

'Disagreement between two neighbors.' Hear from attorney for man accused of attacking Rand Paul. 0:57

'Disagreement between two neighbors.' Hear from attorney for man accused of attacking Rand Paul.

Celebrating 40 years: Rupp Arena, an 'icon' 4:07

Celebrating 40 years: Rupp Arena, an 'icon'

  • Would a tax on tombstones be a hardship for grieving families?

    Blake Shouse, manager of Shelbyville Monument Co. in Shelbyville, Ky., makes his case for why the state should not put a sales tax on tombstones and grave markers. The tax exemption on gravestones costs Kentucky about $8.5 million each year.