Former U.S. Rep. Ed Whitfield, R-Hopkinsville, shown outside the Capitol in 2015, resigned after the Office of Congressional Ethics issued a critical report finding that he allowed his office to improperly help his wife, a lobbyist. Whitfield’s successor, James Comer, R-Tompkinsville, voted against a measure this week that would have gutted the ethics office.
Former U.S. Rep. Ed Whitfield, R-Hopkinsville, shown outside the Capitol in 2015, resigned after the Office of Congressional Ethics issued a critical report finding that he allowed his office to improperly help his wife, a lobbyist. Whitfield’s successor, James Comer, R-Tompkinsville, voted against a measure this week that would have gutted the ethics office. MCT
Former U.S. Rep. Ed Whitfield, R-Hopkinsville, shown outside the Capitol in 2015, resigned after the Office of Congressional Ethics issued a critical report finding that he allowed his office to improperly help his wife, a lobbyist. Whitfield’s successor, James Comer, R-Tompkinsville, voted against a measure this week that would have gutted the ethics office. MCT

Two Kentucky lawmakers say they broke from GOP pack on ethics vote

January 03, 2017 4:46 PM

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