President Lyndon B. Johnson visited Tom Fletcher's house in Martin County in 1964 and listened as Fletcher talked of struggling to support his family. Johnson declared a war on poverty that day that led to trillions of dollars in federal spending, largely through benefits programs such as Medicare, Medicaid, public housing and food stamps.
President Lyndon B. Johnson visited Tom Fletcher's house in Martin County in 1964 and listened as Fletcher talked of struggling to support his family. Johnson declared a war on poverty that day that led to trillions of dollars in federal spending, largely through benefits programs such as Medicare, Medicaid, public housing and food stamps. Walter Bennett Bettmann/CORBIS
President Lyndon B. Johnson visited Tom Fletcher's house in Martin County in 1964 and listened as Fletcher talked of struggling to support his family. Johnson declared a war on poverty that day that led to trillions of dollars in federal spending, largely through benefits programs such as Medicare, Medicaid, public housing and food stamps. Walter Bennett Bettmann/CORBIS

War on poverty failed because it trapped people with handouts, Andy Barr says

August 12, 2016 2:33 PM

More Videos

  • Can Bevin turn the 'sacred cows' of Kentucky's tax code into hamburger?

    Each year, Kentucky gives away more tax revenue through loopholes and incentive programs than it actually collects. Gov. Matt Bevin promised earlier this year to turn some of these "sacred cows" of Kentucky's tax code into hamburger, but that's easier said than done. Here's why.