Education

Three local educators receive Earle C. Clements Innovation in Education awards

Earle C. Clements Innovation in Education Award winners, from left, Steven K. Riley, Whitney Walker and Amy Michele Madsen posed with a sculpture of Earle C. Clements at the University of Kentucky’s M.I. King Library Building.
Earle C. Clements Innovation in Education Award winners, from left, Steven K. Riley, Whitney Walker and Amy Michele Madsen posed with a sculpture of Earle C. Clements at the University of Kentucky’s M.I. King Library Building. University of Kentucky

Awards/honors

▪ The National Archives and the University of Kentucky Libraries Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center presented this year’s Earle C. Clements Innovation in Education Awards to three Central Kentucky educators: Amy Michele Madsen, of George Rogers Clark High School; Steven K. Riley, of Henry Clay High School; and Whitney Walker, of Lafayette High School. The awards, which recognize the state’s best educators in history and/or civics, were presented at a ceremony at the Special Collections Research Center Great Hall in the Margaret I. King Library Building on Aug. 9.

Award winners are selected from elementary, middle and high school history and/or civics (social studies) teachers throughout the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

Madsen has taught social studies in Kentucky for 26 years. Currently, she teaches U.S. history and black history at George Rogers Clark High School in Winchester, where she serves as chair of the social studies department.

Since 2007, Riley has taught social studies at Henry Clay High School in Lexington, where he currently serves as chair of the department.

Walker has spent her entire 12-year teaching career at Lafayette High School in Lexington, where she teaches government and geography.

▪ Five community partners have received Golden Apple Awards from Fayette County Public Schools for their efforts alongside the district and specific schools in 2016-17.

Kelli Parmley, chairwoman of the Community Partners Leadership Team, and Fayette County Public Schools Superintendent Manny Caulk presented the awards at the start of Commerce Lexington’s Spotlight breakfast recently.

Winners are:

Community Action Council — award recipient in the community organizations/nonprofits category; district partner

Rotary Club of Lexington — community organizations/nonprofits; school partner with Booker T. Washington Elementary

Tates Creek Christian Church — faith-based organizations; school partner with Julius Marks Elementary

Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd — faith-based organizations; school partner with Booker T. Washington Elementary

Mark Keith — individual; school partner with the Academy for Leadership at Millcreek Elementary.

▪ Historian Crystal deGregory has been named director of the newly founded Atwood Institute for Race, Education and the Democratic Ideal at Kentucky State University. DeGregory is the founder and executive editor of HBCUstory, an advocacy initiative supporting the future of the nation’s historically black colleges and universities by preserving, presenting and promoting inspiring stories of their past and present.

The institute is named for former KSU President Rufus B. Atwood, who served the school for 33 years and helped cultivate it as an accredited land-grant institution.

DeGregory takes the helm as the inaugural director of the Institute on Sept. 1.

The institute’s mission is to advance research, dialogue and the exploration of the elements of democracy in solving intractable social problems like poverty, race and geography. Special research emphasis will be placed on Appalachia, the African Diaspora and migrant communities.

▪ Bluegrass Community and Technical College student Andrew Boyce has accepted a fellowship with the antipoverty advocacy organization, Results. He recently returned from an international Results conference in Washington, which included panel discussions on domestic and global poverty issues, workshops on media outreach, the legislative process, and strategies for speaking to legislators and their staffs. Boyce’s fellowship will consist of biweekly training on media outreach, legislative outreach, grassroots organizing, and further education on the legislative and appropriations process. Along with 70 fellows across the country and five from Zambia, Boyce will spend the year lobbying congress, creating a Bluegrass Community and Technical College Results chapter and expanding reach into Kentucky congressional districts.

▪ Two students were elected by their Student Government Association peers to serve on the Kentucky Community and Technical College System’s Board of Regents and to serve as student body co-presidents. Gavin Posey of West Kentucky Community and Technical College and Ric Smith of Gateway Community and Technical College will serve one-year terms on the board and as student body co-presidents.

Related stories from Lexington Herald Leader

  Comments