Politics & Government

State official working on Real ID compliance exits from Bevin administration

John-Mark Hack, who testified before a legislative committee last year about new license plates, departed in December 2017 as state vehicle regulation commissioner.
John-Mark Hack, who testified before a legislative committee last year about new license plates, departed in December 2017 as state vehicle regulation commissioner.

John-Mark Hack, who has been trying to help Kentucky comply with federal security regulations involving drivers licenses, is no longer a member of the Bevin administration.

Hack, of Woodford County, left last month as state vehicle regulation commissioner, a position he has held since April 2016 early in Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration, Keith Buckhout, a spokesman for the state Transportation Cabinet, said Friday.

Buckhout said he could not comment on personnel matters and that no replacement has yet been named for Hack. He said the department is functioning under a temporary replacement for Hack.

Hack, in a telephone interview, said, “I left to pursue other interests.” He did not elaborate.

The motor vehicle regulation commissioner regulates commercial vehicles, motor vehicle licensing, driver licensing, and customer service. With about 260 employees, the department collects more than $275 million annually in revenue.

Hack, as vehicle regulation commissioner, spent much time working on the status of Kentucky’s compliance with the federal REAL ID Act of 2005. Kentucky has been receiving extensions to put off implementation of a new high-security driver’s licensing system required by the law.

Prior to joining the state, Hack was president of Flourishing, Inc., a consulting firm specializing in land-based business development. He also served as executive director of the non-profit Local Food Association.

In 2013, Hack ran unsuccessfully for the state House as an independent.

Over his career, Hack worked for a variety of corporate, non-profit, educational and government organizations. Hack’s last state government service was in 1998, when he established the Governor’s Office of Agricultural Policy and served as its first executive director.

Hack served as the first chief executive officer of the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund, president of the Kentucky Tobacco Settlement Trust Corporation and led the effort to diversify Kentucky’s farm economy.

He was an adjunct instructor at the University of Kentucky, where he completed his Master’s degree in 1992. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Transylvania University in 1988.

Jack Brammer: 502-227-1198, @BGPolitics

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