Letters to the Editor

Letters: In praise of books and Joel Pett; some questions about evangelical voters

Books and Barbers program gives kids a free book and $3

Books and Barber program by Harrison Elementary School teacher Simon Vanderpool and Prince Cuts Barbershop owner Amir Shalash aims to curb student summer retention by letting kids read a book during their haircut, earning them the book and $3.
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Books and Barber program by Harrison Elementary School teacher Simon Vanderpool and Prince Cuts Barbershop owner Amir Shalash aims to curb student summer retention by letting kids read a book during their haircut, earning them the book and $3.

Book project local, overseas

We were pleased to see International Book Project referenced in the June 13 Herald-Leader story, “Barber shop keeps kids groomed and literate.” We were glad to help Harrison Elementary teacher Simon Vanderpool’s project. Besides sending books to requesting partners overseas, International Book Project works locally, providing bookcases to refugees, Habitat for Humanity, and veterans’ families in central Kentucky and books to Buckhorn Children’s Center in eastern Kentucky. We welcome donations of money and gently used books and volunteer time to sort and pack books.

Angene Wilson, IBP board president, Lexington

The evangelical vote

As a professor at the fourth largest seminary in the country and as the author of two books on American Evangelicalism, I found Herald-Leader columnist Paul Prather’s recent commentary, “Will Trump Get Same Love from White Evangelicals That He Did in 2016?,” very problematic on a number of levels. Indeed, this piece does little to help the newspaper’s readership understand the voting patterns of this important block of Americans. Dependent on a very dubious source (a “cross-cultural Christian worker” who publishes on the website, “Medium”), Prather held up five points, all of which fail to come to terms in a forthright manner with the motivations, reasons and justifications as to why evangelicals not only abandoned the Democratic presidential candidate in 2016 but also why they will undoubtedly do so once again in 2020. With the Democratic Party now dominated by the New Left and a whirligig of identity politics, and with religion, by the way, often on the ropes, evangelicals quite simply want to vote for someone who doesn’t hate them.

Kenneth J. Collins, Lexington

Cat declawing cruel

I disagree with the veterinarian who recently expressed concern in a letter about a proposed New York ban on declawing cats. She asked, “What care will you be willing to give up” if a government decides a procedure is immoral.

I would welcome government interference if the tips of my fingers or toes were being amputated up to the first joint. This is what happens when a cat is declawed. In my view, that’s animal abuse. I wonder if it’s possible veterinarians wouldn’t want declawing banned because is a relatively quick and easy procedure which brings in big bucks.

Regarding abuse, it is illegal in Kentucky for a vet to report suspected animal abuse. Such a law is misguided and cruel.

Gerry Burchett, Grayson

Pett has right to views

The free press is necessary for the continuance of our democracy. I don’t agree with a recent letter writer’s position that the Herald-Leader’s Joel Pett be fired for a cartoon critical of President Donald Trump, but I will defend his right to say it. By the same token, Pett’s views are legitimate. My position is Pett should be published daily. He is astute and succinct on local and federal issues, and thus challenges thinking. That’s a good thing in today’s world.

M K Davidson, Lexington

Nonsense or satire?

Tribune News Service columnist Jay Ambrose must think readers are all idiots, judging by his nonsensical opinion piece recently published in the Herald-Leader. He argues that Democrats are to blame for human rights abuses at the border because they wouldn’t fund the Republicans’ police state. He says it’s the Dems’ fault because they wouldn’t fund a completely pointless wall and hire more armed guards to patrol the situation, and therefore they had no choice but to lock people up. Ambrose says Trump is planning on a “roundup” of immigrants in this country yet he somehow thinks readers will agree these detention centers aren’t “concentration camps”. I wonder if it’s possible his piece is actually a very pointed satire at conservatives’ inherent hypocrisy. If that’s the case, then it’s genius.

Bronson O’Quinn, Lexington

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