Letters to the Editor

Readers criticize Alvarado vaccination comments, Capitol office space spat

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin introduces his new running mate

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin, a Republican, announced Friday, Jan. 25, 2019, in the Capitol Rotunda that his new running mate this year will be state Sen. Ralph Alvarado, a Winchester physician.
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Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin, a Republican, announced Friday, Jan. 25, 2019, in the Capitol Rotunda that his new running mate this year will be state Sen. Ralph Alvarado, a Winchester physician.

Alvarado’s comments confusing

Dr. Ralph Alvarado, a physician and on the Republican slate with Gov Matt Bevin, is the apparent defender of the current administration’s medical positions. His quote in a recent Herald-Leader story, “I don’t think we should force anybody to do something they don’t want to do with their own bodies,” has me a bit perplexed. I thought the current administration’s position focused on right to life. Apparently, this may not be the case based on the good doctor’s comment. Perhaps Bevin and Alvarado could provide a list of those instances when it is appropriate and inappropriate for individuals to make decisions for themselves about their personal health and well-being to avoid any confusion.

Charles Myers, Lexington

Vaccines, office space

In defending anti-vaccinators, Gov. Matt Bevin’s running mate, Dr. Ralph Alvarado, said that “I don’t think we should force anybody to do something they don’t want to do to their own bodies.” I therefore presume he would agree that a woman facing an unplanned and unwanted pregnancy should not be forced to have the child as it would be something she did not want to do to her own body.

Also, there’s no need for Bevin to move Andy Beshear’s people into a different office in the Capitol. After all since he had the lieutenant governor’s staff fired he could simply move his own people into their vacant offices.

Jay Hopkins, Frankfort

State, not seats

My hat is off to a recent letter writer who suggested replacing political attack ads with videos of a turtle eating carrots. Thanks to the killer Bs (Gov. Matt Bevin and Democratic gubernatorial candidate Andy Beshear) squabbling over where to seat staffers, we have another example of how right the letter writer is. Maybe the Bs should spend more time on serving the state’s needs instead of their own petty agendas.

Grow up boys. This is grade-school stuff.

Patrick Clifford, Versailles

Debate musings

In 2008, I watched Joe Biden’s vice-presidential debate with Sarah Palin, John McCain’s running mate. In a debate in which the elected candidate would be a heartbeat away from the presidency, we expected both debaters to answer the questions they were asked. Biden did, but Palin retreated into her comfort zone, giving scripted answers to questions that weren’t asked. When Palin agreed with Vice-President Richard Cheney’s assertion that the vice-president’s role in the legislature should be expanded, Biden could have made this his “break-out moment,” decrying Palin’s ignorance of the Constitution and pointing out her dangerous misunderstanding about how democracy works. Instead, Biden calmly explained the necessity for preserving the constitutional checks and balances governing the three branches of government. Throughout the debate, Biden treated Palin with gentlemanly respect, and the next day the media concluded that Palin had “exceeded expectations.”

I don’t think lashing out at a woman was in former Vice-President Biden’s DNA then or last week, when Sen. Kamala Harris angrily vilified his civil rights record in the recent Democratic presidential primary debates. I wonder if Biden was stunned that the Democratic debate was becoming more like the 2016 Republican debate. I know I was. But the press loved it.

Shirley Baechtold, Richmond

Chilling viewing

Last week’s second Democratic presidential primary debate was more entertaining, but much scarier, than the first one earlier in the week. It was literally 10 candidates on steroids emulating Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Mayor Bill DeBlasio: unfunded giveaways, open borders with unlimited funding for illegal immigrants, “Medicare for All” with the dissolution of private health insurance that works for 180 million Americans, the Green New Deal, higher taxes, more regulation, less freedom and the overall expansion and intrusion of government control into private life.

Sen. Kamala Harris was outstanding; she saved the debate from the food fight that it started to degenerate into early on. She displayed maturity, control, humor and a good grasp of the issues. I’d support her in a second if she didn’t espouse the most extreme policies of the liberal left. Fortunately, these same policies and extreme positions will be the death knell for any of these candidates in the general election, and President Donald Trump will have four more years.

Pat Nussbaum, Nicholasville

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