Fayette County

See the pattern that lightning scorched into a Lexington golf green last week

During a series of strong storms that moved through Lexington on Friday night, lightning struck a flag in Lakeside Golf Course off Richmond Road. The strike left an intricate pattern on the grass and obliterated the flag, which has since been replaced.
During a series of strong storms that moved through Lexington on Friday night, lightning struck a flag in Lakeside Golf Course off Richmond Road. The strike left an intricate pattern on the grass and obliterated the flag, which has since been replaced. Provided by Chris Boysel

The storms that blew through Lexington last Friday left plenty of damage in their wake, but the scorched grass left by lightning at a golf course has served as a particularly striking reminder of the extreme weather.

An intricate pattern was left on the grounds of Lakeside Golf Course when a lightning strike hit the flag marking the course’s second hole.

“I had never seen it in person,” head golf professional Chris Boysel said of the damage. “It spreads out like lightning in the sky.”

The flag melted and the fiberglass flagpole shattered when the lightning hit, Boysel said, and had been replaced by the time this photo was taken.

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During a series of strong storms that moved through Lexington on Friday night, lightning struck a flag in Lakeside Golf Course off Richmond Road. The strike left an intricate pattern on the grass and obliterated the flag, which has since been replaced. Provided by Chris Boysel

The course had been evacuated because of the weather at the time of the strike.

Boysel said the lightning’s mark is a great example of why the course asks people to get off the green during storms.

“That’s why we tell people, there’s a lot of attractive things on the course to lightning, you’re swinging metal poles, there’s flag poles, trees,” Boysel said.

The hole that was struck is still useable and the grass should grow back on its own, Boysel said.

There was tremendous storm damage in other areas of the course, including downed trees and snapped utility poles, Boysel said. Power was knocked out at the course through Saturday, forcing them to temporarily close.

As of Sunday the course had more or less returned to normal, aside from the unique reminder of the storm at the second hole.

God's Pantry Food Bank and the city of Lexington combined to open several emergency food distribution points around town to help storm victims restock the fridge after the recent power outage.

This was the view Monday morning along a segment of U.S. 62 (Midway Road) between U.S. 60 and Old Frankfort Pike heading toward Midway from Versailles in Woodford County. Numerous trees were uprooted or damaged in Friday's severe weather.

Kentucky Utilities working to restore power in the Cardinal Valley neighborhood on Sunday

Aerial footage of fallen trees blocking Park Ave. in Lexington following Friday's storms in Lexington.

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